Antigua & Barbuda looks to scale up operations at LIAT

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As demand for intra-regional travel grows, Antigua and Barbuda is hoping cash-strapped airline, LIAT, could capitalise on the market and become profitable. CLICK HERE TO JOIN OUR WHATSAPP GROUP FOR NEWS UPDATES.

Speaking at today’s post-cabinet media briefing, Information Minister Melford Nicholas revealed that the government, which is a major shareholder in LIAT, took a decision to scale up operations at the airline.

Currently, LIAT has three ATR 42-600s in its fleetand they carry passengers to destinations including Antigua, St Maarten, Dominica, Barbados and Grenada.

“We are at a stage where LIAT 1974 limited has continued to operate. Of course, they are encumbered by the Limited number of aircraft. So the intention is to scale up the operations to ensure we can have at least two more aircraft available on wet leases for the continuing operation,” he stated.

“It is more than likely that the new format of LIAT—LIAT 2020, would be the institution that takes on the wet leases and make them available to LIAT 1974 until we have completed the conversion of LIAT 2020.”

Nicholas noted that Antigua and Barbuda has the support of regional leaders, particularly those in the Eastern Caribbean who have been clamouring for greater connectivity in the sub-region. — LOOP

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5 COMMENTS

  1. lets start simple with running water, working bag scanners at the airport and a well maintained and stocked health system. why cant we fix this everyday issues first before lighting a money bonfire?

  2. https://www.transportation.gov/policy/aviation-policy/small-community-rural-air-service/essential-air-service

    Compensation Procedures

    The Department pays the carriers in arrears on a per-flight-completed basis. At the beginning of each month, carriers submit claims for the prior month based on the number of flights that it actually completed in conformance with the contract. Carriers submit invoices requesting a subsidy amount in accordance with maximum allowances stipulated by the contract and detailing the service actually completed, including date of service, aircraft type, routing, and frequency of service, and any actual variations from the service contemplated by the contract. When a carrier is forced by operational exigencies to make ad hoc service adjustments to its service — aircraft type or routing — the carrier reports those deviations on its invoice and appropriate adjustments are made. For instance, if the carrier substituted a smaller, less expensive aircraft type than agreed to, perhaps because the larger aircraft had a mechanical problem, the subsidy rate would be reduced accordingly.

  3. Which LIAT? The one being sold to the Nigerians for 5 million US? The one in which the deal was already signed to have all the Antiguan managers and supervisors replaced by Nigerians? We agree that the head of that department, yes, the 5 years to complete an MBA, American speaking, do no work one needs to go.

    Those so called Executives are scampering up there now worried about their jobs and pay checks which was always their only concerns. They ran the airline down to the ground. The Administrator knows it, the governments know it. They were used to keep the airline alive.

    Now they are all going to get the boots, in their neenen.

    Oh, and the Nigerian getting all the tax breaks in the world..how nice.

  4. Not a word on severance from these wicked leaders! Please call the election so that we the LIAT workers may register our displeasure with this wicked uncaring government!!

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